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caplan

Dr. Arnold I. Caplan

16:00|Session 12 (Stage 3)

“Cell-Based Therapies as the New Medicine of MSCs”

Dr. Caplan has published numerous works on the embryonic development and tissue engineered repair of bone, cartilage, muscle, tendon, dermis and other tissues as a component of his interests in Regenerative Medicine. More recently he and his collaborators have helped define the immuno-regulatory and tropic activities of MSCs as manifested by the secretion of a complex array of bioactive molecules at sites of tissue injury or inflammation.

Dr. Arnold. I. Caplan came to Case Western Reserve University as Assistant Professor of Biology in 1969 and rose through the ranks to become Professor in 1981.
 
He has received a number of awards including the Elizabeth Winston Lanier Award given by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons as part of their 1990 Kappa Delta Awards Program, the 1999 Marshall R. Urist Award for Excellence in Tissue Regeneration Research given by the Orthopaedic Research Society, the Genzyme Lifetime Achievement Award giving by the International Cartilage Repair Society in 2007 and the Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Society‘s Life Time Achievement Award in 2010.
 
Dr. Caplan has trained over 125 researchers, has over 390 published papers and manuscripts and has long been supported by the National Institutes of Health and other non-profit and for-profit agencies for his efforts in trying to understand the development, maturation, aging, and regeneration of cartilage, bone, skin and other mesenchymal tissues and for his pioneering research on Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs).
 
Since the 1970’s, he has published works on the embryonic development and tissue engineered repair of bone, cartilage, muscle, tendon, dermis and other tissues as a component of his interests in Regenerative Medicine. More recently he and his collaborators have helped define the immuno-regulatory and tropic activities of MSCs as manifested by the secretion of a complex array of bioactive molecules at sites of tissue injury or inflammation.  With the identification of MSCs as perivascular cells, or pericytes he has proposed how MSCs function in vivo at sites of tissue regeneration and, thus, defined the logics for self-repair within the context of Regenerative Medicine.  He recently suggested as the secretory source of bioactive agents that the MSC be renamed as the Medicinal Signaling Cell because of its controlling role in the regeneration of damaged tissue.

Dr. Caplan has taken three sabbatical leaves: one in 1973 as a Visiting Professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics at the University of California at San Francisco Medical School with Brian McCarthy and William Rutter; one in 1976 in the Institute de Chimie Biologique at the Faculty of Medicine de Strasbourg in the Laboratory of Pierre Chambon; and lastly, the Edna and Jacob Michael Visiting Professor of the Department of Biophysics with Nathan Sharon at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel in 1984.

He received his BS in Chemistry at the Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois; and his PhD from The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. Dr. Caplan did a Postdoctoral Fellowship in the Department of Anatomy at The Johns Hopkins University, followed by Postdoctoral Fellowships at Brandeis University, Waltham, Massachusetts with Dr. N. O. Kaplan and Dr. E. Zwilling.